Lisa Panepinto

On This Borrowed Bike

Poems by Lisa Panepinto

On This Borrowed Bike, poems by Lisa Panepinto

On This Borrowed Bike, poems by Lisa Panepinto

“Lisa Panepinto’s abstract and lyrical vignettes serve as a wonderful introduction to a fresh new voice, bound to rattle the canon.” –Patricia Smith, poet, National Book Award for Poetry finalist

A stunning first collection full of lyrical, heartwarming poems by the remarkable Lisa Panepinto. Her remarkable words touch on the suffering of the disenfranchised was well as the beauty and power of nature. Award-winning Native America poet Joy Harjo (How We Became Human) praises: “These minimalist and imagistic poems in Lisa Panepinto’s new collection of poetry are woven with the gossamer of crow dreams and water from endangered rivers. In these pages Justice falls in love with the blues. There’s scuffling and dancing, and it’s all coming down to what happens in the dark. There is enough love for everyone. Lisa Panepinto sings.  You’ll want to be here.” And award-winning poet Annie Finch expands, “imply complex and universally individual, Lisa Panepinto’s poems encompass politics and the soul, nature and the body, paradox and the mind. Panepinto’s voice is so assured and pure, so confident and directed, that to follow it on its intricate and profound journeys can bring serious joy.  Far more ambitious than they might at first appear, influenced by Native American, beat, and experimental poetics alike, these are poems that do not shrink from the poet’s oldest task, the mighty healing work of the shaman.”


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Praise for Lisa Panepinto’s On This Borrowed Bike

“Lisa Panepinto’s abstract and lyrical vignettes serve as a wonderful introduction to a fresh new voice, bound to rattle the canon.”
Patricia Smith, Shoulda Been Jimi Savannah

“These minimalist and imagistic poems in Lisa Panepinto’s new collection of poetry are woven with the gossamer of crow dreams and water from endangered rivers. In these pages Justice falls in love with the blues. There’s scuffling and dancing, and it’s all coming down to what happens in the dark. There is enough love for everyone. Lisa Panepinto sings. You’ll want to be here.”
Joy Harjo, She Had Some Horses

“Lisa says ‘waves turn to songs’, and these songs rise from the depths, explode into blue skies, call down ghosts and fog, sing down lonely streets, find homes in hearts and we want to sing with her—gladly. The gifts these poems bring fill our baskets, fill our hearts, wash over us, rich waves of song.”
Gary Lawless, Poems for the Wild Earth

“Lisa Panepinto brings her world to us slowly, as it has come to her, mostly a voice from the northern Rockies, a voice of rivers & mountains, mining & logging, farm & ranch towns, a mix of tribes & ethnicities hard to find elsewhere. She is a young woman already wise in the ways of the poor & disenfranchised, wise as well in the natural & spirit worlds too few are able to understand as one.”
James Koller, Snows Gone By

“Simply complex and universally individual, Lisa Panepinto’s poems encompass politics and the soul, nature and the body, paradox and the mind. Panepinto’s voice is so assured and pure, so confident and directed, that to follow it on its intricate and profound journeys can bring serious joy. Far more ambitious than they might at first appear, influenced by Native American, beat, and experimental poetics alike, these are poems that do not shrink from the poet’s oldest task, the mighty healing work of the shaman.”
Annie Finch, Among the Goddesses: An Epic Libretto in Seven Dreams


Reviews

Lisa Panepinto: Spirit Rolodex Some like Sexton, tear us apart with the horror and the beauty of life; some, like Lorca, give us the infinite song of symbolism, and some, like Panepinto, connect us to the great web of existence, remind us that the hidden thoughts that pulse with the breath of the world belong to us as well. Hers is a world where wind turns a down jacket into wings, where all gods are black and “black is universe / black is trust”, where the lens over the left eye is love, the lens over the right is suffering, and the resulting view is that everything we share breath with has its own dignity, however dark and dusky. Quenton Baker, on the Poet by Poet blog


About Lisa Panepinto

Lisa Panepinto

Lisa Panepinto

Lisa Panepinto is a poet, writer, radio host and performer. She is the author of the chapbook Island Dreams and poetry editor for Cabildo Quarterly. Her writing has appeared in the Accompanist, Maine Peace Action Committee, River Pine Anthology of Civic Discourse, and Maintenant. She holds degrees from Washington State University and the University of Southern Maine, and currently lives in Pittsburgh. She was awarded the President’s Medal for Volunteerism for her work with senior Native Americans in Maine.

 

 

 

 


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